Zen and the Art of Screenwriting 2

More Insights and Interviews


$21.95

  • 332 Pages
  • 8x8 Paper
  • Silman-James Press
  • 9781879505568
  • 1-879505-56-8
  • Available electronic format(s):
    Kindle, iBook,

This collection of new essays and interviews with some of Hollywood’s top screenwriters, producers, and directors is a sequel to Froug’s highly popular Zen and the Art of Screenwriting.  Here, Froug once again weaves fascinating, informative interviews with essays that provide sage advice and fresh, thought-provoking insights for both novice and seasoned screenwriters.

The essays cover such diverse subjects as creating your own talent, guarding your surprises, reinventing old ideas, using guilt as a writer’s tool, getting your scripts read, Hollywood’s rewrite panic, story-structure gurus, entering screenplay contests, Hollywood’s ephemeral enthusiasms, and why rooting interest isn’t necessary.

Interviewed are
Scott Frank (Get Shorty, Dead Again)
Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential, Payback)
Nicholas Kazan (Reversal of Fortune, Fallen)
Frank Pierson (Dog Day Afternoon, Cool Hand Luke)
Eric Roth (The Horse Whisperer, Forrest Gump)
Aaron Sorkin (A Few Good Men, The American President)
Robin Swicord (Little Women, Practical Magic)
Richard Donner (Lethal Weapon, The Omen)
Lauren Shuler-Donner (Any Given Sunday, Bulworth).

“Three cheers for Bill Froug, who supports the creative art of screenwriting and attacks the tired and outmoded ‘structure workshop’ approach. Great movies need great screenplays, and great screenplays are not made from formulas. Froug has had enormous success as a writer, producer, and teacher, and offers levelheaded advice and penetrating interviews. He encourages writers to express their own visions, instead of recycling tired old outlines. Unlike most screenwriting books, this one could inspire movies I’d actually love.”
—Roger Ebert

William Froug

William Froug (1922-2013) was an Emmy-winning writer-producer, author, and screenwriting professor. His television credits include The Twilight Zone, Playhouse 90,  Gilligan's Island, Charlie's Angels, and Bewitched. While serving as executive in charge of drama at CBS, he pursued teaching and became an adjunct professor at USC’s film school from 1968-1975. Later, he became a tenured professor at UCLA, where he founded it's present film and television writing program. The Producers Guild named him Producer of the Year in 1956, and the Writers Guild of America awarded him their Valentine Davies Award in 1987. He is the author of five books on screenwriting and a memoir, How I Escaped from Gilligan's Island: And Other Misadventures of a Hollywood Writer-Producer.